MAURI , MAURI OHOOHO, MAURI TAU

Uepoto

PAKEHA TERM: Dwarfism

Ira Iti

THINGS YOU CAN DO TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR

ROLE MODELING

Think about own behavior & role modelingtamāiti will copy! Keep to familiar routines so they know what to expect.

 

 

VISUAL REMINDERS

Have visual reminders about routines to support their understanding 

Have photos or draw pictures of what happens each day, or use a sand timer to show how long before bed.

KEEP INSTRUCTIONS

 short, simple & clear.

KEEP INSTRUCTIONS

Teach tamāiti what you want them to do, instead of what not to do, eg. ‘Please walk when you’re inside’ instead of ‘don’t run’.

GIVE FRAQUENT &

SPECIFIC PRAISE

Look for opportunities where you can comment on them behaving appropriately & positively, eg. ‘I’m really proud of the way you are playing with Tama’ instead of saying ‘good boy’.

USE DISTRACTION

Quick & excited distractions are a useful technique if you notice tamāiti about to react in an inappropriate way, eg. ‘Oh look at the big tower Ariana has built’.

GIVE OPTIONS

Having a choice can empower tamāiti to choose more positive behaviours, eg. if they are resisting coming inside, say ‘Okay do you want to hold my hand or shall we race inside to kai?’

HELP TAMĀITI BACK INTO PLAY

If they have been upset, wait until they are calm & ready to join play, then support them to do that – either individually or in a group activity.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPEMENT

An important part of the social & emotional development for tamaiti is learning & inter- acting with others. Kaiako can help this by promoting peer relationships between tamaiti.

 

BEHAVIOUR IS USUALLY
A RESPONSE TO AN EMOTION OR SITUATION

 

 

How tamaiti understand & express their emotions significantly impacts their ability to manage themselves in everyday life.

 

Tamaiti who have difficulty regulating their emotions are likely to also have problems managing their behaviors.

 

These challenges can often relate to difficulties with communication, social interactions & other areas of development.

AGES AND STAGES

The following is a general guide of what to expect at each age – each tamāiti is unique & will develop at their own pace

 

BABIES

Show emotions through crying, laughing smiling.

2 YEARS

Respond to waiata, hold their toys, read books.

1 YEAR

Play next to and along side other children

4 - 5 YEARS

Pretend play e.g. pretending a doll is a baby, enjoy play with other tamaiti, become upset less often than they used to, & calms down more

Strong relationships with all tamāiti, whānau & kaiako

BUILDING

KNOWING

all tamāiti well & understanding their preferences & dislikes

FOCUSING

on the strengths of the tamāiti

HELPING

Children to understand how they are feeling by labelling them, e.g. happy, sad, disappointed, proud, shy

THINGS TO CHECK

Has your tamāiti had their hearing checked?

 

KAO

 

Does your tamaiti have difficulty understanding instructions or questions?

 

KAO

 

Does your tamāiti have difficulties playing with & alongside others?

KAO

 

ĀE

 

ĀE

 

ĀE

 

ĀE

 

KAO

 

What is going on before the un- wanted behaviour starts? Can this be changed, planned for, or avoided?

 

How are others responding to the behaviour? Is it making the situation worse?

 

Are there life changes or experiences that could be contributing to this behaviour? (eg. birth of a new baby, whānau moving etc.)

 

ĀE

 

KAO

 

ĀE

 

KAO

 

IF YOU ANSWER ĀE TO ANY OF THE PĀTAI, YOU CAN TRY THE FOLLOWING:

 

Use the tips in the “Things you can do to promote positive behaviour section in this information sheet.

Have a korero with someone who knows your child well (eg. kaiako, other whānau). Have they noticed the same things?

Are the kaiako using any strategies that you could also use at home? It can make a big difference when mātua & kaiako are using the same strategies.

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